Red Hat ditches MySQL, switches to MariaDB

ditto

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Red Hat will switch the default database in its enterprise distribution, RHEL, from MySQL to MariaDB, when version 7 is released. [..]

Once RHEL makes the switch, it will flow on to CentOS, a distribution that provides RHEL without the trademarks, hence making it free in terms of cost.
Read the article at http://www.itwire.com/business-it-news/open-source/60292-red-hat-ditches-mysql-switches-to-mariadb

Related forum thread http://forum.directadmin.com/showthread.php?t=45512
 

ditto

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Whats wrong with you? If you don't have anything to say, don't say it!

By the way, it is not old news. It was announced on the Red Hat summit in Boston on Friday (that is today, this friday), and the article at itwire.com was published today.

It is also hot news discussed at slashdot today: http://linux.slashdot.org/story/13/06/14/1225257/red-hat-ditches-mysql-switches-to-mariadb

The old news would be that MariaDB would be added as default in Fedora, however it is new that it is going to be added to Red Hat 7.
 
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nobaloney

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The question still remains: Should we offer it to hosting clients?

And my point still remains that our clients know and understand the term MySQL but most likely still don't know the term MariaDB.

You can't just be a geek and be a successful hosting provider; you still need to give your clients what they think they want and need. If you try to convince them they don't need MySQL you're (perhaps unfortunately) fighting an uphill battle.

Jeff
 

dmacleo

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The question still remains: Should we offer it to hosting clients?

And my point still remains that our clients know and understand the term MySQL but most likely still don't know the term MariaDB.

You can't just be a geek and be a successful hosting provider; you still need to give your clients what they think they want and need. If you try to convince them they don't need MySQL you're (perhaps unfortunately) fighting an uphill battle.

Jeff
if its the default for centos (for example) do we have a choice?
short of having to remove and add repos of course.
from what I have read its seamless drop in but I may be (heck probably am...) wrong.
 

nobaloney

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if its the default for centos (for example) do we have a choice?
short of having to remove and add repos of course.
Of course we have a choice. MySQL is managed through CustomBuild. CustomBuild uss RPMs to install MySQL on CentOS-based servers (at least in the server I just looked at). I don't know if the RPMs are custom built for DirectAdmin or not, but if they aren't, they certainly could be. And if DirectAdmin staff doesn't do it, and you really don't want to install custom RPM repositories (I already do for certain programs I need) you can always install it from Source. The beauty of DirectAdmin is that it doesn't limit you.
from what I have read its seamless drop in but I may be (heck probably am...) wrong.
Doesn't matter if it's a seamless drop-in or not. Who's going to get the hosting business? They provider who says We supply MySQL or the provider who says We install MariaDB; you may not have heard about it but we know it's a seamless drop-in replacement for MySQL, the database you've used in the past?

My guess is the former.

Perhaps I'm wrong, but I think it's strictly a political decision based on who controls MySQL development. And that's never a good reason to make a decision. Perhaps at some point in the future, yes, put your eggs in the MariaDB basket, but I wouldn't do it until/unless all the major programs and platforms that our clients want, need, and use, list MariaDB as a requirement instead of MySQL. I believe that otherwise we're fighting an uphill battle we don't need to fight.

Continued discussion is welcome.

Jeff
 

dmacleo

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Of course we have a choice. MySQL is managed through CustomBuild. CustomBuild uss RPMs to install MySQL on CentOS-based servers (at least in the server I just looked at). I don't know if the RPMs are custom built for DirectAdmin or not, but if they aren't, they certainly could be. And if DirectAdmin staff doesn't do it, and you really don't want to install custom RPM repositories (I already do for certain programs I need) you can always install it from Source. The beauty of DirectAdmin is that it doesn't limit you.

Jeff
thats actually what I meant by adding/removing repos, should have phrased that better.
actually I would, from what I read, welcome mariadb.
I'm not really sure (and I could be wrong) this is a political only decision (probably plays a small role though) seeing as how so many others are doing it too.
what would be nice is ability to choose per server easily, which again relates to the custom additions.
I do have concerns about the mariadb longevity due to funding though, so this should be a decision made in haste.
 

ditto

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Personally I feel sure that within maximum two years, all the big CMS, like WordPress, Drupal, Joomla etc, will list both MySQL and MariaDB on their requirement pages. I hope that in the future, DirectAdmin will give us the choice in options.conf to set MySQL or MariaDB.

At the moment, I am holding back upgrading to MySQL 5.6.x, because I am afraid that I will loose the "seamless drop in replacement" that MySQL 5.5.x is for MariaDB. However I am still considering this, and might upgrade. I feel maybe I should upgrade to MySQL 5.6.x before I upgrade to PHP 5.5.x - much to think about. But I hope for the freedom to select MySQL or MariaDB in Custombuild in the future.

One thing is out of any doubt, and that is MariaDB will be a big player soon, because so many big distroes makes it default in future versions.
 

DirectAdmin Support

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Hello,

We'll continue to monitor what happens before making any decisions.
I don't feel a huge amount of pressure to rush into it at the moment.

John
 

nmb

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Of course we have a choice. MySQL is managed through CustomBuild. CustomBuild uss RPMs to install MySQL on CentOS-based servers (at least in the server I just looked at). I don't know if the RPMs are custom built for DirectAdmin or not, but if they aren't, they certainly could be.
To answer this question, The RPMs from DirectAdmin is exactly the same as RPMs from MySQL. (Linux Generic) I usually download the one from MySQL and run the ./build update_versions to speed up the process. (No need to wait for download.) I used to ask smtalk about this but thing is never changed even with CB 2.0. The upgrade for MySQL will include both download and upgrade at the same time with ./build update_versions and the download speed from DirectAdmin server from my server is very slow.
 

SeLLeRoNe

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You should try ./build set_fastest to check the faster mirror for you.

Maybe you're using files1 and is too far away from your server location. ;)

Regards
 

nmb

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You should try ./build set_fastest to check the faster mirror for you.

Maybe you're using files1 and is too far away from your server location. ;)

Regards
Thanks SeLLeRoNe, you're correct, I always stick with files1 since I always want the latest when update the server :p
 

SeLLeRoNe

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Well, usually mirrors are synced within 24 hours or less, i dont think that a day difference will change something, also, will give you the opportunity to see if anyone updated without issue.

Regards
 

MtK

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The question still remains: Should we offer it to hosting clients?

And my point still remains that our clients know and understand the term MySQL but most likely still don't know the term MariaDB.

You can't just be a geek and be a successful hosting provider; you still need to give your clients what they think they want and need. If you try to convince them they don't need MySQL you're (perhaps unfortunately) fighting an uphill battle.

Jeff
That's an interesting statement and as much as it might be true, in the upcoming CB2.0 you also provide NGINX, PHP-FPM, RUID2, 2 types of webmail, MTAs, and other thing that the chances that your clients would know something about it is very small. Even more, just ask yourself how many of your clients would know how to ditch the .htaccess that comes with their favorite CMS and know how to replace it with NGINX rewrite rules...

MariaDB is a fork of MySQL, so when it comes to clients that will get MySQL same way they are expecting APACHE when you give them NGINX as a reverse proxy, just to get some boost in performance.

so, I say... why not add MariaDB to CustomBuild and let the sysadmin the option to choose between MySQL and MariaDB...
 

nobaloney

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You've quoted a post of mine from June; that's a long time in this industry :).

Please don't confuse me with someone who makes decisions over what DirectAdmin supports/includes and what it doesn't. I am not a DirectAdmin staff member; only a lowly forum manager.

And DirectAdmin staff has already posted that they're keeping an eye on it. I never said don't support it; only that it shouldn't be included instead of MySQL. I'm sorry if I wasn't clear.

But those packages you've mentioned, added to CB 2, all add specific functionality (and therefore value) to DirectAdmin, and in purely personal opinion, it's too early to say that about MariaDB.

Does DirectAdmin really support another MTA besides Exim? If so, what?

Thanks for your input.

Jeff
 

MtK

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no sorry, I know you are not part of the DA's team.
I was just pointing out that allowing an alternative (MySQL or MariaDB) is exactly the same as APACHE/FPM/NGINX - clients will probably not be aware of the different and for them, if their wordpress works, they are happy.

but if there are 2 options for FTP and 2 if not 3 variations for a webserver, then why not offer 2 variations for SQL as well...?
 
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